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Welcome to the Wendish Research Exchange's WendBlogs section. Here you will read the musings and advice from one of several Wendish Blogmeisters whom have generously volunteered their time to participate. Please recognize that responses to your comments may or may not be forthcoming, but you are certainly encouraged to comment.

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Weldon Mersiovsky… (The Sorbs (Wends)…): One cannot at this point say “more of German decent that Sorbian” because we do not know how long th…
Tim Hengst (The Sorbs (Wends)…): You mention that Niemtschk is a Wendish name for “German”. Would this mean that Niemtschk’s from So…
Gerald Stone (FROM DUB TO DUBE): I suppose the question is: ‘Is Trautsch a Wendish name?’ To answer in the affirmative, we should hav…
Magdala Trautsch … (FROM DUB TO DUBE): My ancestry includes the Kaspers from Kolpen and the Trautsches from Ranis, Thuringia. I am very in…
Sandy Biar (FROM BÄHR TO BIAR…): Bill, Thank you for your insightful and detailed research. I very much enjoyed reading it, much o…
Roger Bagula (Alias - Genannt -…): I have several relatives who used this form in documents, but their children seem to have gone back …

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Welcome to "Stockwendish!"

Tuesday 18 November 2014 at 4:45 pm

Bill Biar, who grew up in Thorndale, Texas and lived in Carrollton, Texas until he passed away on 30 Oct 2012 was a dedicated researcher and prolific writer of things Wendish.  He was a dedicated Christian who wrote 40 hymns set to to traditional Lutheran music and often, along with his wife, Steffi, assisted the Concordia Historical Institute in St Louis, Missouri by transliterating and translating German documents and letters.  He had made significant contributions of books, papers, and electronic media files to the Texas Wendish Heritage Society, in Serbin, Texas.  This blog is an attempt to take his electronic media files and make them available to everyone.

We decided to use the term "Stockwendish" to identify this blog.  If you do not know what "stockwendish" means, you will need to read on.  Clicking on a title below will take you directly to the subject you click on.

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FROM BÄHR TO BIAR

Friday 05 April 2013 at 12:58 am

Index

Preface

Some Background

Bähr (Baehr) - Biar

Our Bähr to Biar Lineage

Notes

Hans Bähr and Urthe Kayser

George Bähr (Juri Biar) and Wurta Paulik

Johann (Jan) Biar and Hanna Hennersdorf

Johann (Jan) Biar and Anna Maucke (Małke)

Michael Biar and Anna Schneider

Johann Biar and Magdalene Möhle (Mehle)

Andreas Biar and Maria Therese Hattas

Johann Otto Biar and Lydia Lina Moerbe

Biar Descendants in Germany

The Biars in Australia

Translation of Letter dated 22 April 1881

Coping with Gröditz Records

Gröditz (Groeditz) and Hrodźiščo

Sermon Delivered by Rev. F. H. Stelzer at the Funeral of Otto Biar

Sermon Delivered by Rev. F. H. Stelzer at the Funeral of Lydia Biar

7-7-96

Revised: 11-18-02

Revised: 6-10-04

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FROM KRISTIAN TO ZIESCHANG

Thursday 04 April 2013 at 8:55 pm
Index
Spelling of Personal and Place Names
From Kristian to Zieschang
Our Zieschang Lineage
Notes
Johann Zieschang and Hanscha Hommel
Magdalene Zieschang and Carl Michalk
Johann Zieschang (1810)
Peter Zieschang
Ernstine Zieschang and Ernst Michalk
Therese Zieschang
Too Many Johann Zieschangs
SPELLING OF PERSONAL AND PLACE NAMES
The German language employs modified vowels (Umlaut - Umlaute) ä, ö and ü. As a rule, all German names of persons, places, etc., on church and archive records and maps employ umlauts to indicate modified vowels when applicable. We retain umlauts in English by writing ä, ae; ö, oe; and ü, ue. Thus, BÄHR is written BAEHR; MÖRBE, MOERBE; and WÜNSCHE, WUENSCHE. The spelling of place names with umlauts has been retained throughout
this history. However, the spelling of personal names with umlauts was discontinued after the names were “transplanted” in Texas.
7-25-96
Revised 11-18-02
Revised: 6-12-04
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FROM MJELA TO MOEHLE (MÖHLE)

Wednesday 03 April 2013 at 01:43 am

Index

Spelling of Personal and Place Names  

From Mjela to Möhle (Moehle)

Our Mjela to Moehle Lineage

Notes

Johann Möhle and His Wife, Dorothea 

Andreas Möhle and Anna Wuchatsch

Magdalene Möhle and Johann Biar

Obituary of Magdalene Biar, nee Moehle

SPELLING OF PERSONAL AND PLACE NAMES

The German language employs modified vowels (Umlaut - Umlaute) ä, ö and ü.  As a rule, all German names of persons, places, etc., on church and archive records and maps employ umlauts to indicate modified vowels when applicable. We retain umlauts in English by writing ä, ae; ö, oe; and ü, ue. Thus, BÄHR is written BAEHR; MÖRBE, MOERBE; and WÜNSCHE, WUENSCHE. The spelling of place names with umlauts has been retained throughout this history. However, the spelling of personal names with umlauts was discontinued after the names were “transplanted” in Texas.

7-8-96

Revised: 11-18-02

Revised: 6-6-04

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FROM DUB TO DUBE

Tuesday 02 April 2013 at 5:16 pm

Index

Spelling of Personal and Place Names

From Dub to Dube

Our Dube Lineage

Notes

Christoph Dube and His Wife

Michael Dube and Johanna Rosina Tanniger

Johanne Rachel Dube and Ferdinand Jacob Moerbe

Other Dubes

SPELLING OF PERSONAL AND PLACE NAMES

The German language employs modified vowels (Umlaut - Umlaute) ä, ö and ü. As a rule, all German names of persons, places, etc., on church and archive records and maps employ umlauts to indicate modified vowels when applicable. We retain the umlauts in English by writing ä, ae; ö, oe; and ü, ue. Thus, BÄHR is written BAEHR; MÖRBE, MOERBE; and WÜNSCHE, WUENSCHE. The spelling of place names with umlauts has been retained throughout this history. However, the spelling of personal names with umlauts was discontinued after the names were “transplanted” in Texas.

8-23-96

Revised: 11-18-02

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FROM DZICK TO MITSCHKE TO MOERBE

Sunday 31 March 2013 at 1:08 pm
Index
Preface
Some Background
Our Dzick to Mitschke to Moerbe Lineage
Notes
Merten Dzick and His Wife, Urta
Jury Dzick and Hanna Brauzke, nee Donke
Jakob Dzick-Mitschke-Mörbe and Maria Lück
Jakob Mörbe and Anna Nurčan
Testament of Judge and Armorer Jakob Mörbe
Retirement
Mertin Nurčan's Day in Court
The Thaler (Taler)
Jakob Mörbe and Maria Kuchar
Ferdinand Jacob Moerbe and Johanne Rachel Dube
Jacob Moerbe's Obituary
Excerpt from Pastor Kilian’s Letter dated 10-19-1858
Carl August Moerbe and Ernestine Michalk
Lydia Lina Moerbe and Johann Otto Biar
Other Moerbes
Johann Carl Mörbe (1826)
Ernst Adolph Moerbe (1824)
Johann Mörbe [Moerbe] (1830)
Pastor Gustav Mürbe (Mjerwa)
Mörbe (Moerbe) or Mjerwa
Dubrausky (Dubrauske)
Dubrausky (Dubrauske) Lineage
Guttau or Hučina
Excerpt from A Centennial Story of the Lutheran Church in Texas - Page 99
2-22-96
Revised: 11-18-02
Revised: 6-12-04
PREFACE
This history is about the Moerbe family and covers some of its genealogy and a variety of subjects pertinent to the family’s background. It was not my intention to write a complete history and genealogy of the Moerbe family. My resolve was to go back as far as possible and bring the family from Lusatia and “transplant” it in Texas. Perhaps someday someone will bring the history and genealogy up-to-date.
My knowledge of German enabled me to do much research in that language. The fact that I spent two years (1945 - 1947) with U.S. Army Intelligence in Germany gave me an insight into gathering information. Researching your "roots" is much like collecting intelligence data - you need to fit the bits and pieces together. In work like this persistence, accuracy and perseverance are of utmost importance.
In 1972 I made a trip to the Bautzen area in East Germany and visited many of the villages listed in this history. Another trip was made in 1982 and two more trips were made in 1992 and 1994. There was also very much correspondence with various people, most of it in German.
I want to thank all those who helped me with dates of birth, marriage and death. If any of you want to use parts of this history, or make a copy of all or part of it, you have my permission. However, I would greatly appreciate hearing from you and invite your comments. This history has been revised several times and copies have appeared under several titles. I had no intention of revising it again, but since I lost my last revision in my old computer, I loaded what I had into my new computer and, naturally, I revised it again, hopefully for the last time.  Should you find any errors, please call them to my attention. As corrections and additional information become available addenda may be warranted.

I owe a debt of gratitude to the late Frau Annemarie Mihan, Niedergurig, Germany, who supplied much of the information of the early history of the Moerbe family and who answered a multitude of my questions. It was a great pleasure for me to meet this fine Christian lady in 1982. At least 25 letters flowed each way. Frau Mihan was in her middle eighties when she suffered a stroke and died in 1989. Her late husband, Johannes, was a descendant of Maria Mitschke, the daughter of Jakob Dzick, aka Mitschke, and his first wife, Anna Mitschke, neé Britsche.  Jakob Mitschke, later adopted the surname Mörbe and his daughter, Maria Mitschke, was then known as Maria Mörbe. Frau Mihan's late husband was also related to the Biar side of my family. In 1992 I had the pleasure of visiting Frau Mihan's son, Johannes, in Niedergurig.

For those who do not know me, permit me to mention that I am a native of Thorndale, Texas. My parents were Otto Biar and Lydia, neé Moerbe. In 1947 I married Stefana Todt who was born and grew up in Neisse, Silesia (Schlesien), Germany. Since 1968 we have been living in Denver where I completed 36 years as an accountant with Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) before retiring on 1 August 1983. In February 2001 we moved to Carrollton, Texas.

Bill Biar

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FROM CHĔŽNIK TO KIESCHNICK

Sunday 31 March 2013 at 01:22 am

Index

Spelling of Personal and Place Names

From Chěžnik to Kieschnick

Our Kieschnick Lineage

Notes

Johann Kieschnick and Maria Wutscher

Johann Kieschnick and Agnes Kalich or Kohli

Obituary of Johann (Jan) Kieschnick (1795)

Magdalene Kieschnick and Johann Hottas (Hattas)

Other Kieschnicks

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FROM STERP TO HOTTAS

Saturday 30 March 2013 at 11:42 pm

Index

Spelling of Personal and Place Names

From Sterp to Hottas

Our Sterp to Hottas Lineage

Notes

Petri Sterp and his wife, Marie

Jano Sterp and his wife, Marie

Johann Sterp and his wife, Marie

Georg Sterp and his wife, Marie

Johann Sterp, aka Hottass, and Marie Prelop, aka Hottass

Georg Hottass, aka Herz, and Johanna Hodźik, aka Herz

Andreas Hottas (Hattas) and Maria Schulze

Johann Hottas (Hattas) and Magdalene Kieschnick

Maria Therese Hattas and Andreas Biar

Johann Otto Biar and Lydia Lina Moerbe

From Prelop to Hottas

Our Prelop to Hottas Lineage

Jacob Hottass and his wife, Hanna

Marie Hottass and Michael Prelop, aka Hottass

Marie Prelop, aka Hottass, and Johann Sterp, aka Hottass

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FROM MICHAŁ TO MICHAŁK

Saturday 30 March 2013 at 5:09 pm

Index

Spelling of Personal and Place Names

From Michał to Michałk

Notes

George Michalk and His Wife, Agnes

George Michalk and Magdalene Eyen

Carl Michalk and Magdalene Zieschang

Other Michalks

Andreas Michalk and Caroline Krakovsky

Maria and Hanna Michalk

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Fourscore Years Plus Ten

Tuesday 06 November 2012 at 9:17 pm

Bill Edwin Biar died on 30 Oct 2012, in Carrollton, Texas having reached the age of 93 years, three months and 23 days. The following words were written on his 90th birthday.

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Old Lutheranism and the Wends

Saturday 19 November 2011 at 12:09 am

Most of the descendants of the Wends in the United States do not know the impact that Old Lutheranism had on their Wendish forefathers who came to Texas in the middle of the 19th century.

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German Immigration to the USA

Saturday 19 November 2011 at 12:05 am

The table shows the German migration to the United States from 1821-1900*.

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Provinces (Länder) of Modern Germany After Unification of 1990

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:55 pm

Names of the provinces of modern Germany in German and English.

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The Oder - Neisse Line

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:46 pm

To better understand the Oder-Neisse Line, the modern boundary between Germany and Poland, please refer to Map I.

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Emancipation of the Peasants in Silesia and Saxony

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:42 pm

The emancipation of the peasants of Silesia was set in motion by the Oktoberedikt  of 1807.

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My Foreign Born Ancestors Who Came to Texas

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:37 pm

While searching for my roots I discovered that eleven of my ancestors were on the BEN NEVIS that brought the large immigration of Wends to Texas in 1854.  There were seven on my father's (Otto Biar) side and four on my mother's (Lydia Biar, nee Moerbe) side.

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Some Observations about Researching the Wends

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:33 pm

It is a pity that so much of the history written about the borderland between Slavs and Germans is steeped in bias and prejudice.  There were no early Slavic historians.

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Half-Timbered Construction

Friday 18 November 2011 at 11:16 pm

Early German and Slavic tribes did not know the art of construction with brick and stone as the Romans did, but used wood.  Later on as wood became scarce a method usually referred to as “HALF-TIMBERED” construction was employed.

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Place Names

Friday 18 November 2011 at 10:37 pm

Nearly all information for this article was taken from Die Ortsname der Oberlausitz (Place Names of Upper Lusatia) by Jan Meschang.

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Alias - Genannt - AKA- Also Known As

Friday 18 November 2011 at 10:31 pm

The practice of assuming other surnames (aliases) by some of our Wendish or Sorbian ancestors in Lusatia makes research rather difficult at times.

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What's in a Name

Friday 18 November 2011 at 10:24 pm

Besides written records, onomastics ( the science and study of the origins and forms of proper names of persons and places)  may be used to study and interpret the historical, linguistic and cultural development of an area.  Slavic tribes living in isolation fostered dialects, whose particularisms were reflected in names.  As tribes moved to new locations, new names were coined.

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Christianization of the Wends

Friday 18 November 2011 at 10:20 pm

There is some evidence that the mission of Saints Cyril and Methodius (born in Thessalonica in the 820s), the Apostles to the Slavs, reached the Bautzen area.  Their mission of evangelization, in the latter part of the ninth century, took them to Great Moravia, which, at that time, included Bohemia and other central European territory.  It is known that they reached Görlitz, Königshain and Jauernick, west of the Lusatian Neisse River, less than 30 miles east of Bautzen.  Ancient stone crosses have been found near Guttau and near Gleina.  Some researchers believe that these could have been sites of the first Christian preaching stations or, perhaps, sites of the first baptisms in the area.

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Hill-Forts

Friday 18 November 2011 at 10:12 pm

Archaeological discoveries in Lusatia and surrounding territory have produced many artifacts and much valuable information of the early Sorbian tribes and their culture.  It appears certain that additional discoveries will yield many more artifacts and information.  Sites of old medieval fortifications appear to have the greatest potential.

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The Manorial System

Friday 18 November 2011 at 9:58 pm

The villages in which our ancestors lived in Lusatia were sites of manors.  These manors, or landed-estates, were in possession of noblemen for many generations.

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The Sorbs (Wends)

Friday 18 November 2011 at 9:02 pm

The Sorbs, as they always wanted to be called, or Wends, as the Germans, called them, descended from the Slavs.  Numerically, the Slavs are the largest linguistic group in Europe, numbering some two hundred million people.  The geographical origin of the Slavs has always been problematic.  Their history pre-dates the Christian era.  Roman historians, Pliny the Elder and Tacitus, in the first century A. D., and the Greco-Egyptian geographer, Ptolemy, in the second, used Venedi to identify the Slavs.  Much speculation surrounds the origin of the word Venedi.  The least questionable appears to be the dark-haired Celts used the term Uindo for the white-haired primitive Slavs.  Uindo, which has reference to white or blond, derivated to Venedi, used by the early writers.  Later, the Germans adopted Venedi in the form of Wenden (Wends) to identify all Slavs who lived in Germany.  The Slavs never referred to themselves as Venedi, but called themselves Sclaveni or a similar name.

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