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Weldon Mersiovsky… (The Sorbs (Wends)…): One cannot at this point say “more of German decent that Sorbian” because we do not know how long th…
Tim Hengst (The Sorbs (Wends)…): You mention that Niemtschk is a Wendish name for “German”. Would this mean that Niemtschk’s from So…
Gerald Stone (FROM DUB TO DUBE): I suppose the question is: ‘Is Trautsch a Wendish name?’ To answer in the affirmative, we should hav…
Magdala Trautsch … (FROM DUB TO DUBE): My ancestry includes the Kaspers from Kolpen and the Trautsches from Ranis, Thuringia. I am very in…
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Stockwendish

Sunday 16 October 2011 at 6:21 pm

I was “Stockwendisch,” as one would say in German; that is, Wendish to the core or “hardshell” Wendish.  Here is my story.

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Recollections & Reflections II. SERVICE IN THE STATES

Saturday 15 October 2011 at 6:00 pm

SERVICE IN THE STATES

This work was undertaken to relate some of the things that the writer experienced or remembers happening during the writer’s lifetime.  The writer at this writing is well over the Biblical threescore and ten years old (Ps. 90).  It is not uncommon that when a person gets on in years that he will reflect on the past.  The past takes a person back to the “good old days,” even though they often were not all that good.  We should not live in the past, but there is no harm in recalling events that took place in one’s life.  It keeps a person’s mind occupied and it can turn out to be a good pastime.

This reminds me of the time when two old timers met and one asked the other one, “Do you remember the white dog you had back in 1935?  You were very proud of him.  What ever happened to him?”  The other old timer thought for awhile and then asked, “When do you want to know?”

At times it certainly does take awhile to remember things.  Diaries and old letters are very valuable to help in recalling events that happened years ago.  The source of most of the material relating to my military service is the diary I kept during this time.  Rev. F. H. Stelzer gave me a diary on February 22, 1942 to get me started.  Steffy’s diary is the source of very much material after we were married.  It also helps to do some reminiscing with relatives and peers.

After my grandmother, Mrs. Ernestine Moerbe, died in 1936 we moved south of Thorndale to live with my grandfather, August Moerbe.  At that time I was 17 years old.  It was very interesting for me to hear my grandfather tell of some of the things that happened during his lifetime.  For instance, I will never forget when he told me of moving from Fedor to Thorndale in 1899.  He sold his property in Fedor and with the money placed in a molasses bucket and the bucket placed under the seat of the wagon, he headed for Thorndale.  Imagine traveling that way today.  He told me about the hard work of clearing the land he had purchased before it could be farmed.  “Clearing land” seems to miss some of the real meaning of making land arable.  In German my grandfather said, “Alles musste mit einer Rodehacke ausgerodet werden” (Everything had to be cleared with a mattock).  All  underbrush and stumps and roots of  trees had to be dug up by hand.  I did just enough “grubbing” with a “grubbinghoe” to know the drudgery of  this backbreaking  hand  labor.  Remember, there were no bulldozers in those days.  Hearing my grandfather tell of  his many experiences led me to appreciate what went on before my time.  Perhaps some one in coming years will be interested in my RECOLLECTIONS AND REFLECTIONS, which relate some of the things that went on during my lifetime. 

There are four parts to this work, namely:

                                     I. Recalling the Early Years

                                    II. Service in the States

                                    III. Service Overseas

                                    IV. Moving On

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Recollections & Reflections III. SERVICE OVERSEAS

Friday 14 October 2011 at 6:33 pm

III. SERVICE OVERSEAS

A LITTLE BACKGROUND

On April 20, 1945 I was transferred to the Army Intelligence School at Camp Ritchie, Maryland.  Since the war in Europe ended on May 8 I never finished intelligence school and several hundred German speaking personnel from Camp Ritchie were sent to Germany as replacements.  I kept a diary while I was in the service and the greater part of  the following was taken from my diary.  I also drew from Steffy's diary.

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Recollections & Reflections IV. Moving On

Thursday 13 October 2011 at 6:48 pm

IV. MOVING ON

COOLING OFF

When we arrived in Thorndale from Germany on August 9, 1947 it was awfully hot - over 100 degrees.  It seldom gets that hot in Germany and Steffy really had trouble getting used to the heat and humidity.  There was no air conditioning in those days.  Several times I took her to Uncle Emil's (Moerbe) ice house so that she could “cool off.”  Perhaps we were a little overly concerned, but Steffy says that while she went to school in Germany when the temperature reached 77 degrees by ten o'clock the children were sent home at noon.

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Recollections & Reflections I. RECALLING THE EARLY YEARS

Wednesday 12 October 2011 at 5:40 pm

RECALLING THE EARLY YEARS

This work was undertaken to relate some of the things that the writer experienced or remembers happening during the writer’s lifetime.  The writer at this writing is well over the Biblical threescore and ten years old (Ps. 90).  It is not uncommon that when a person gets on in years that he will reflect on the past.  The past takes a person back to the “good old days,” even though they often were not all that good.  We should not live in the past, but there is no harm in recalling events that took place in one’s life.  It keeps a person’s mind occupied and it can turn out to be a good pastime.

This reminds me of the time when two old timers met and one asked the other one, “Do you remember the white dog you had back in 1935?  You were very proud of him.  What ever happened to him?”  The other old timer thought for awhile and then asked, “When do you want to know?”

At times it certainly does take awhile to remember things.  Diaries and old letters are very valuable to help in recalling events that happened years ago.  The source of most of the material relating to my military service is the diary I kept during this time.  Rev. F. H. Stelzer gave me a diary on February 22, 1942 to get me started.  Steffy’s diary is the source of very much material after we were married.  It also helps to do some reminiscing with relatives and peers.

After my grandmother, Mrs. Ernestine Moerbe, died in 1936 we moved south of Thorndale to live with my grandfather, August Moerbe.  At that time I was 17 years old.  It was very interesting for me to hear my grandfather tell of some of the things that happened during his lifetime.  For instance, I will never forget when he told me of moving from Fedor to Thorndale in 1899.  He sold his property in Fedor and with the money placed in a molasses bucket and the bucket placed under the seat of the wagon, he headed for Thorndale.  Imagine traveling that way today.  He told me about the hard work of clearing the land he had purchased before it could be farmed.  “Clearing land” seems to miss some of the real meaning of making land arable.  In German my grandfather said, “Alles musste mit einer Rodehacke ausgerodet werden” (Everything had to be cleared with a mattock).  All  underbrush and stumps and roots of  trees had to be dug up by hand.  I did just enough “grubbing” with a “grubbinghoe” to know the drudgery of  this backbreaking  hand  labor.  Remember, there were no bulldozers in those days.  Hearing my grandfather tell of  his many experiences led me to appreciate what went on before my time.  Perhaps some one in coming years will be interested in my RECOLLECTIONS AND REFLECTIONS, which relate some of the things that went on during my lifetime. 

There are four parts to this work, namely:

                                     I. Recalling the Early Years

                                    II. Service in the States

                                    III. Service Overseas

                                    IV. Moving On

Read More