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Welcome to the Wendish Research Exchange's WendBlogs section. Here you will read the musings and advice from one of several Wendish Blogmeisters whom have generously volunteered their time to participate. Please recognize that responses to your comments may or may not be forthcoming, but you are certainly encouraged to comment.

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Dan (Death on the Iris…): Regarding Kilian’s “Finally on the 26th of September we left Liverpool, leaving the sick behind in t…
Weldon (The Texas Wendish…): In the Wendish language obituary of John Schatte, John Kilian tells the sad tale of the death of Joh…
Dan Carter (The Texas Wendish…): I have a question. I’m certain that Rosina Mrosko is noted somewhere with the word “Wobaj”. I’m al…
Jim Woelfel (Excerpts from Emi…): Emilie Woelfel Michalk was my fathers sister and thus my aunt. Most of what we know about their ear…
Johnny Kasper (Wendish Settlers …): Ps- Johann Kasper was not born in Kolpen, as thought. According to church records, he was born in Te…
Johnny Kasper (Wendish Settlers …): Hi Debbie, I did go to Germany and spent some time in the church in Lohsa. It was well worth the …

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The Canadian Wendish Family Pages

Thursday 01 December 2011 at 11:48 pm

The formation of the Canadian Wendish family pages was part of the research process for In Search of a Home.  In addition to identifying individual Wends, the collected information could be used to show the number of immigrants, the waves of migration, intermarriage with other Wends, and the destinations. The information was limited to the first two generations of immigrant Wends and the information would include such things as the dates and places of birth and death, the date of migration, the names of their parents, and the names of the spouses. The information came from such sources as church records, obituaries, newspapers, and census records.

Because the pages were never intended for public use, I did not identify the source of each bit of information nor did I observe a high standard of penmanship. Shortly after In Search of a Home was published I received numerous requests for family history and the family sheets often contained helpful material. So I decided to make my family notes available for research and sent copies of the Australian families to the Lutheran Archives in Adelaide, the Texas families to the Wendish Archives in Serbin, the Iowa families to Cathy Petersen, and the Canadian families to Brenda Lee-Whiting.

When you encounter pages with notes written with red ink, these notes were penned while I was doing research in what was the German Democratic Republic.  Information in green ink was provided by Brenda Lee-Whiting, author of Harvest of Stones.

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The Texas Wendish Family Pages

Thursday 01 December 2011 at 10:19 pm

The formation of the Wendish family pages was part of the research process for In Search of a Home.  In addition to identifying individual Wends, the collected information could be used to show the number of immigrants, the waves of migration, intermarriage with other Wends, and the destinations. The information was limited to the first two generations of immigrant Wends and the information would include such things as the dates and places of birth and death, the date of migration, the names of their parents, and the names of the spouses. The information came from such sources as church records, obituaries, newspapers, and census records.

Because the pages were never intended for public use, I did not identify the source of each bit of information nor did I observe a high standard of penmanship. Shortly after In Search of a Home was published I received numerous requests for family history and the family sheets often contained helpful material. So I decided to make my family notes available for research and sent copies of the Australian families to the Lutheran Archives in Adelaide, the Texas families to the Wendish Archives in Serbin, the Iowa pages to Cathy Petersen, and the Canadian pages to Brend Lee-Whiting.

When you encounter pages with notes written with red ink, these notes were penned while I was doing research in what was the German Democratic Republic.

Read More