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Welcome to the Wendish Research Exchange's WendBlogs section. Here you will read the musings and advice from one of several Wendish Blogmeisters whom have generously volunteered their time to participate. Please recognize that responses to your comments may or may not be forthcoming, but you are certainly encouraged to comment.

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Weldon (The Texas Wendish…): In the Wendish language obituary of John Schatte, John Kilian tells the sad tale of the death of Joh…
Dan Carter (The Texas Wendish…): I have a question. I’m certain that Rosina Mrosko is noted somewhere with the word “Wobaj”. I’m al…
Jim Woelfel (Excerpts from Emi…): Emilie Woelfel Michalk was my fathers sister and thus my aunt. Most of what we know about their ear…
Johnny Kasper (Wendish Settlers …): Ps- Johann Kasper was not born in Kolpen, as thought. According to church records, he was born in Te…
Johnny Kasper (Wendish Settlers …): Hi Debbie, I did go to Germany and spent some time in the church in Lohsa. It was well worth the …
Debbie Frankenbac… (Wendish Settlers …): Johnny Kasper, I am also a descendent of Andreas Kasper. he is my great, great, great grandfather.…

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Identifying Wends

Wednesday 30 April 2014 at 3:11 pm

Defining a Wend is not difficult. Identifying one can be a problem. Decades have passed and generations have succeeded each other since the Wendish migration to Texas. Even in contemporary Germany there are people with Wendish names who do not speak Sorbian and consider themselves German. So if you are studying your ancestry what are the clues that indicate descent from Wendish ancestors? Here are some:

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Wendish Settlers 1849 - 1853

Tuesday 29 April 2014 at 8:02 pm

This article first appeared in several issues of the 2003 and the October 2010 issue of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society Newsletter. It was last revised on April 15, 2012.

Before the Ben Nevis entered the harbor at Galveston, three sets of Wends had already landed in Texas. The members of the first group arrived in 1849, the second in 1852, and the third in 1853.

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Wendish Immigration By Year

Monday 28 April 2014 at 8:06 pm

The following list first appeared in the Texas Wendish Heritage Society Newsletter of January 2008. It was last revised on March 31, 2012.

This list is not a final list nor is it the final word. Be aware that some persons on the list may not be Wends, and most likely there are Wends who are not on the list. But at least it is a start and it may help in family research. Please submit any additons or corrections.

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