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Welcome to the Wendish Research Exchange's WendBlogs section. Here you will read the musings and advice from one of several Wendish Blogmeisters whom have generously volunteered their time to participate. Please recognize that responses to your comments may or may not be forthcoming, but you are certainly encouraged to comment.

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Dan (Death on the Iris…): Regarding Kilian’s “Finally on the 26th of September we left Liverpool, leaving the sick behind in t…
Weldon (The Texas Wendish…): In the Wendish language obituary of John Schatte, John Kilian tells the sad tale of the death of Joh…
Dan Carter (The Texas Wendish…): I have a question. I’m certain that Rosina Mrosko is noted somewhere with the word “Wobaj”. I’m al…
Jim Woelfel (Excerpts from Emi…): Emilie Woelfel Michalk was my fathers sister and thus my aunt. Most of what we know about their ear…
Johnny Kasper (Wendish Settlers …): Ps- Johann Kasper was not born in Kolpen, as thought. According to church records, he was born in Te…
Johnny Kasper (Wendish Settlers …): Hi Debbie, I did go to Germany and spent some time in the church in Lohsa. It was well worth the …

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Wendish Settlements - Knippa, Texas by Jan Slack and George Nielsen

Monday 16 March 2015 at 12:51 am

Other than Serbin and Warda, place names that reflect the Wendish presence in Texas are hard to find. There is one more, however, in Uvalde County, between San Antonio and Mexico, an area where you would least expect to find it. The town, originally called Chatfield, was renamed Knippa after George Knippa, who settled there in 1887. In the following article, Jan Slack provides a brief history of the town of Knippa and its Wendish roots. Jan is a past TWHS president and secretary, and currently serves on the board of directors and as the newsletter editor. Her connection to the Wends is through both her parents (great-great-grandfathers Johann Knippa and Mathaus Wukasch migrated on the Ben Nevis in 1854). She was born and raised in Austin and now resides in Lee County with her husband Charlie. She has three grown children and a 6- year-old granddaughter.

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Johann Kilian's Call by George Nielsen

Monday 16 March 2015 at 12:45 am

This article first appeared n the July 2008 Newsletter of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society in Serbin, Texas. (www.texaswendish.org)

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Fedor by George Nielsen

Monday 16 March 2015 at 12:41 am

This article first appeared n the January 2009 and April 2009 Newsletters of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society in Serbin, Texas. (www.texaswendish.org)

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Becoming Men: How Two Wends Did It in 1882 by George Nielsen and Luther Dube

Monday 16 March 2015 at 12:29 am

This article appeared in the October 2010 Newsletter of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society of Serbin, Texas. (www.texaswendish.org)

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The Aftermath of the Ben Nevis Voyage: Reconstruction by George Nielsen

Monday 16 March 2015 at 12:07 am

This article was first printed in the January 2012 edition of the Newsletter of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society in Serbin, Texas (www.texaswendish.org).

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How do you get to Serbin? by George Nielsen

Monday 16 March 2015 at 12:05 am

This article was first published in the July 2011 Newsletter of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society in Serbin, Texas. (www.texaswendish.org)

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A Nation for the Wends by George Nielsen

Sunday 15 March 2015 at 11:51 pm

This article first appeared in the January 2010 edition of the Newsletter of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society in Serbin, Texas. (www.texaswendish.org)

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Identifying Wends

Wednesday 30 April 2014 at 3:11 pm

Defining a Wend is not difficult. Identifying one can be a problem. Decades have passed and generations have succeeded each other since the Wendish migration to Texas. Even in contemporary Germany there are people with Wendish names who do not speak Sorbian and consider themselves German. So if you are studying your ancestry what are the clues that indicate descent from Wendish ancestors? Here are some:

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Wendish Settlers 1849 - 1853

Tuesday 29 April 2014 at 8:02 pm

This article first appeared in several issues of the 2003 and the October 2010 issue of the Texas Wendish Heritage Society Newsletter. It was last revised on April 15, 2012.

Before the Ben Nevis entered the harbor at Galveston, three sets of Wends had already landed in Texas. The members of the first group arrived in 1849, the second in 1852, and the third in 1853.

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Wendish Immigration By Year

Monday 28 April 2014 at 8:06 pm

The following list first appeared in the Texas Wendish Heritage Society Newsletter of January 2008. It was last revised on March 31, 2012.

This list is not a final list nor is it the final word. Be aware that some persons on the list may not be Wends, and most likely there are Wends who are not on the list. But at least it is a start and it may help in family research. Please submit any additons or corrections.

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Wends Who Broke the Pattern

Saturday 15 March 2014 at 10:35 pm

The large majority of Wends who migrated to Texas in 1854 either stayed with the core settlement around Serbin or followed several paths to neighboring communities. But there were also some who broke the pattern and thereby ended their intimate association with the Wendish community.

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Lay Leaders of the Migration and Settlement

Tuesday 26 February 2013 at 5:20 pm

Many people participated in what became the settlement known as Serbin, but six men were designated as officers of the group that sailed on the Ben Nevis and helped shape the congregation.

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Nebraska Wends

Sunday 20 May 2012 at 10:12 pm

This article first appeared in the October 2006 issue of the Texas Wendish Heritage Newsletter and was last revised on May 20, 2012.

Nebraska became the home for two groups of Wends. Both groups were from Lower Lusatia not far from Cottbus and migrated in the last three decades of the nineteenth century. The Wendish pastor, Mato Kosyk (Kossick) visited both communities and in all likelihood he informed the two groups of each other, but nothing indicates any association between the two.

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Iowa Wends

Friday 27 April 2012 at 11:56 pm

THE DRAGON’S CHILDREN

At the conclusion of a session at Concordia Historical Institute, a retired pastor from Iowa informed me that a group of Wends had also settled in State Center, Iowa. Although I found it difficult to imagine that such a settlement could exist and not be hinted at in Texas sources, I kept his assertion in the back of my mind. Finally, in 1989, I wrote to Pastor Marvin Flanscha, pastor of St. John Lutheran Church, a congregation three and one-half miles north of State Center, for verification. He substantiated the existence of the Wends and on a subsequent trip to the area I examined the church records and also spoke to a woman named Mrs. Atvea Schmelich Zeisneiss who said “My father spoke Vendish.”

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Reluctant Confederates

Tuesday 20 March 2012 at 10:00 am

The following article first appeared in the Texas Wendish Heritage Society Newsletter beginning in July 2005 and concluding with the April 2006 issue. It was last revised on March 18, 2012. 

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The Canadian Wendish Family Pages

Thursday 01 December 2011 at 11:48 pm

The formation of the Canadian Wendish family pages was part of the research process for In Search of a Home.  In addition to identifying individual Wends, the collected information could be used to show the number of immigrants, the waves of migration, intermarriage with other Wends, and the destinations. The information was limited to the first two generations of immigrant Wends and the information would include such things as the dates and places of birth and death, the date of migration, the names of their parents, and the names of the spouses. The information came from such sources as church records, obituaries, newspapers, and census records.

Because the pages were never intended for public use, I did not identify the source of each bit of information nor did I observe a high standard of penmanship. Shortly after In Search of a Home was published I received numerous requests for family history and the family sheets often contained helpful material. So I decided to make my family notes available for research and sent copies of the Australian families to the Lutheran Archives in Adelaide, the Texas families to the Wendish Archives in Serbin, the Iowa families to Cathy Petersen, and the Canadian families to Brenda Lee-Whiting.

When you encounter pages with notes written with red ink, these notes were penned while I was doing research in what was the German Democratic Republic.  Information in green ink was provided by Brenda Lee-Whiting, author of Harvest of Stones.

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The Texas Wendish Family Pages

Thursday 01 December 2011 at 10:19 pm

The formation of the Wendish family pages was part of the research process for In Search of a Home.  In addition to identifying individual Wends, the collected information could be used to show the number of immigrants, the waves of migration, intermarriage with other Wends, and the destinations. The information was limited to the first two generations of immigrant Wends and the information would include such things as the dates and places of birth and death, the date of migration, the names of their parents, and the names of the spouses. The information came from such sources as church records, obituaries, newspapers, and census records.

Because the pages were never intended for public use, I did not identify the source of each bit of information nor did I observe a high standard of penmanship. Shortly after In Search of a Home was published I received numerous requests for family history and the family sheets often contained helpful material. So I decided to make my family notes available for research and sent copies of the Australian families to the Lutheran Archives in Adelaide, the Texas families to the Wendish Archives in Serbin, the Iowa pages to Cathy Petersen, and the Canadian pages to Brend Lee-Whiting.

When you encounter pages with notes written with red ink, these notes were penned while I was doing research in what was the German Democratic Republic.

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