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Dr Charles Wukasch's Works

Wednesday 27 March 2024 at 11:33 am.

Use this list as a guide to the documents in the blog. Entries in bold  are in his blog.

Books:

1. A Rock against Alien Waves: A History of the Wends. Austin: Concordia UP, 2004.

2. A Practical Grammar of Upper Sorbian (Wendish). Serbin (TX): Texas Wendish Heritage Society, 1993.

Articles:

1. “Serbska Folklora w Texasu.” Rozhlad 50 (2000): 218-19.

2. “The Seventh Book of Moses.” Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin 55 (1991): 48-50.

3. “'Dragons' and Other Supernatural Tales of the Texas Wends.” Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin 52 (1987): 1-5.

4. "Wends (Sorbs) in the United States." An Encyclopedia of American Folklore. Edited by Jan Harold Brunvand. page 755.

Reviews:

1. Geschichte der Sorbischen Grammatikschreibung: Von den Anfängen bis zum Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts, by Sonja Wölke. Schriften des Sorbischen Instituts 38. Slavic and East European Journal 52 (2008): 339-40.  

2. Lowerwendish-English and English-Lowerwendish Dictionary -- Dolnoserbsko-Engelski a Engelsko-Dolnoserbski Słownik , by Martin Dobring, Hornjoserbsko-jendźelski Słownik -- Upper Sorbian-English Dictionary, by Gerald Stone. Slavic and East European Journal 47 (2003): 154.

3. Serbšćina. Najnowsze Dzieje Języków Słowiańskich, ed. Helmut Faska, Verschwundene Dörfer:  Die Ortsabbrüche des Lausitzer Braunkohlenreviers bis 1993, by Frank Förster, Sprachwechselprozeß in der Niederlausitz: Soziolinguistische Fallstudie der  Deutsch-Sorbischen Gemeinde Drachhausen/Hochoza, by Madlena Norberg, Die Rechtliche Stellung der Sorben in Deutschland, by Thomas Pastor, and Sorabistik in Deutschland: Eine Wissenschaftsgeschichtliche Bilanz aus Fünf Jahrhunderten, by Wilhelm Zeil. Slavic and East European Journal 44 (2000): 165-66.

4. Perspektiven Sorbischer Literatur, ed. Walter Koschmal. Slavic and East European Journal 39 (1995): 153-54. 

5. Probleme Europäischer Kleinsprachen Sorbisch und Bündnerromanisch , by Roland Marti. Slavic and East European Journal 36 (1992): 139-40.

6. In Search of a Home: Nineteenth-Century Wendish Immigration, by George R. Nielsen. Southwestern Historical Quarterly 94 (1991): 504-05.

7. Powědamy Dolnoserbski -- Gutes Niedersorbisch, by Herbert Nowak. Slavic and East European Journal 33 1989): 637.

8. “The Wends.” Austin American-Statesman 11 Oct. 1990: A10. (Letter to editor)

9. “Wendische Geschichten.” TAGS 38.6 (1991): 1. (Texas Association of German Students journals)

10. “Die Wenden.” TAGS 30.3 (1982): 3. (Texas Association of German Students journals)

11. Ein Staat - eine Sprache?: Deutsche Bildungspolitik und Autochthone Minderheiten im 20. Jahrhundert. Der Sorben im Vergleich mit Polen, Daenen, und Nordfriesen, by Edmund Pech. Schriften des Sorbischen Instituts 56. Domowina-Verlag: Bautzen 2012. 352 pp. Euros 24.90 (paper). Slavic and East European Journal.

Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod publications:

1. “The First Wend of the Historic 1854 Immigration to Texas.” Lutheran Witness 108.9 (1989): 12L (Texas District supplement).

2. “Wendish Reunions Uphold Lutheran Heritage.” Lutheran Witness 108.5 (1989): 12K (Texas District supplement).

3. “John Kilian.” Lutheran Witness 108.4 (1989): 11.

4. “The Folklore of the Texas Wends.” Concordia Connections 5.3 (1988): 8.

Texas Wendish Heritage Society (TWHS) & Museum Newsletters:

1. "Obituary for Victor Zoch.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter 7.4 (1994): 4.

2. “Wendish Poem.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter 6.2 (1993): 5.

3. “Wendish Poem.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter 6.2 (1993): 5.

4. “Wendish Poem.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter 4.7 (1991): 5.

5. “Rumpodich.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter  4.11 (1991): 5.

6. “Časnosć - Temporality.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter  4.5 (1991): 5-6.

7. “Herta Wićazec - The First Female Wendish Author.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter 3.4 (1990): 4.

8. “Popajźony Spěwarik - A Songbird in a Cage.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter 3.3 (1990): 4.

9. “Jurij Brězan’s ‘O Blessed Child’.” TWHS & Museum Newsletter  2.5 (1989): 3.

Papers at Scholarly Conferences:

1. “Religious and Intellectual Movements of the Sorbs in the 18th and 19th Centuries: Pietism, the Enlightenment, and Panslavism.” Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures Section. South Central Modern Language Association Convention. San Antonio. 7 Nov. 2008.

2. “Characteristics and Taxonomy of Minority Language Survival - The Evidence from the Sorbian Languages.” The Maintenance/Revitalization of Minority Languages in Europe and Canada: Theory and Practice Section. Western Social Sciences Association Convention. Calgary (Canada). 13 Apr. 2007.

3.  “Marja Grólmusec: The Rosa Luxemburg of the Sorbs.” Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures Section. South Central Modern Language Association Convention. New Orleans. 29 Oct. 2004.

4. “Upper Sorbian vs. Lower Sorbian, Macedonian vs. Bulgarian: A Comparative Study of Ethnicity and Language.” Ethnic Minority Issues in South and East Central Europe Section. Rocky Mountain Association of Slavic Studies Convention. Las Vegas. 10 Apr. 2003.

5. “The Sorbian Languages in the New Germany: Language Maintenance and Ethnic Nationalism.” Language as a Means to Ethnic Identity Section. American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Convention. New York. 29 Dec. 2002.

6. “The Influence of the Reformation on Sorbian Culture.” German I: Linguistics, Literature, and Culture before 1700 Section. South Central Modern Language Association Convention. Austin. 2 Nov. 2002.

7. “Die Sorbische Sprache in Texas: Soziolinguistische Aspekte der Zweisprachigkeit.” Potsdam University, Berlin. 14 May 1999.

8. “Jakub Bart-čišinski: Iconoclast of the Sorbs.” Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures Section. South Central Modern Language Association Convention. New Orleans. 12 Nov. 1994.

9. “Upper Sorbian in Texas: Language Loss in a Trilingual Community.” Slavic Canada and Slavic America Section. Rocky Mountain Association of Slavic Studies Convention. Albuquerque. 21 Apr. 1994.

10. “The Seventh Book of Moses: A Wendish Folkloric Motif.” Folklore Section. South Central Modern Language Association Convention. Fort Worth. 1 Nov., 1991.

11. “Herta Wićazec - The First Female Sorbian Author.” Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures Section. South Central Modern Language Association Convention. Fort Worth. 31 Oct., 1991.

12. “The Upper Sorbian Language in Texas.” West Slavic Linguistics Section. American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Convention. New York. 28 Dec. 1976.

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